Author Topic: Taverner Wheel-table  (Read 2194 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Taverner Wheel-table
« on: October 20, 2014, 07:44:44 AM »
I wrote this up last year and formatted it as one post, but Hans tells me I would have to third-party host the pics to group them, and I have not done it - and it's been a year - so I am going to put it here as a series of separate posts.  The tool shown here is pretty easy to build, and has been useful not only for building wheels, but also in pinstriping them on one occasion.  The wheel-table adds nothing to one's ability to build a wheel - but it does take some time off for sure.  The project shown here is not the absolute ideal for the table - which is a spoke change - but it was still a time-saver on the rim-change shown below.

  This is the rear wheel off a GT550 Suzuki triple I had when I was fifteen; the last few years I have been running this on the back of my GN400 single.  Since Gary Ball gave me a GT750 Water Buffalo front drum brake which I laced into a Yamha TX750 rear rim (from Roy's originally: perfect fit, as the rear drum on the Yamaha was almost identical in size to the Suzuki front drum) with XS650 spokes, I needed to match the deep-shouldered rear rim from the TX750 (which was now on the front of my GN) with a matching rim laced to the GT550 rear hub.  Since I had an extra 18" Yamaha 650 rear rim (also from Roy's at some point), that was the easy source for a deep shouldered rim.

  Here is the wheel as I was using it, and the rim I want to lace in...

 

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 08:14:07 AM by Rusty Bucket »

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2014, 07:47:49 AM »
  Here is the GT550 wheel on the table, with the hub clamped to the centre-post, but the four rim supports still loose...

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2014, 07:50:28 AM »
...and here the supports are snugged up to the rim in height and circumference, maintaining the wheel's original concentricity and offset. The twist-ties tie in the spoke pattern, and if there is a trick, this is it - do not be tempted by tape - the twist-ties allow the patten to be retained, but allow some movement up and down the length of the spoke - a good thing.

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 07:54:33 AM by Rusty Bucket »

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2014, 07:56:34 AM »
 ... and we can pull the nipples off the spokes, as all of our variables are locked in.

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2014, 07:59:16 AM »
... and with the nipples gone, we can pull the rim, which in this case went off to vex Kawmeister.

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2014, 08:01:51 AM »
...and now we can drop on the alloy Yamaha rim, which in this case requires some fussing with math, and re-adjusting the supports, as it was slightly different in width than the steel rim it is replacing.  The table holds the offset and the concentricity while you add the nipples finger tight - until the spokes have no tension, but no movement.

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 08:04:35 AM by Rusty Bucket »

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2014, 08:08:31 AM »
  Then the complete assembly - which will roll pretty much as true as the one that was put on the table originally - can go off to the truing stand - and that is where the time is saved, as the wheel starts from a point very close to where you want it.

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]

Rusty Bucket

  • Guest
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2014, 08:12:50 AM »
...and after the spokes are tight,  a tire levered on, and the assembly balanced,  the whole thing is ready to go back on the bike, and now my little single has matching alloy deep-shouldered rims - and brakes off much larger, heavier, and faster machines - at both ends. 

[attachment deleted by admin due to full attachment storage]
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 08:21:20 AM by Rusty Bucket »

Dennis

  • Club Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1429
    • View Profile
Re: Taverner Wheel-table
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2014, 11:49:51 AM »
Great post Russell. 

I still have never laced a wheel.  Could be that I prefer mags and seldom have the need.  The one time in recent history I needed a wheel laced I dropped it off with Jim for a weekend and picked it up finished.  He laced the hub of the Ebay Bobber to a 16" rim.

Peace & Grease, Dennis